News Releases

30 July 2008
TIMING IS EVERYTHING: HOW VULNERABLE TO FLOODING IS NEW YORK CITY?

A report just released in the most recent issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society offers hope that a new high-resolution storm surge modeling system developed by scientists at Stony Brook University will better be able to predict flood levels and when flooding will occur in the New York metropolitan area, information crucial to emergency managers when planning for impending storms.
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24 July 2008
Fully Updated Climate Change Book by Scripps Researcher Now Available from AMS

A comprehensive and up-to-date account of climate change science by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego climate scientist Richard Somerville is now available from the American Meteorological Society. 

16 April 2008
Media Advisory: Press Briefing and National Teleconference Weather Modification: The State of the Science

Commercial operators, governments, and academic researchers worldwide are engaging in cloud seeding and other weather modification projects to try to influence local conditions. But how effective are these programs?

15 January 2008
Record warm summers cause extreme ice melt in Greenland

An international team of scientists, led by Dr Edward Hanna at the University of Sheffield, has demonstrated that recent warm summers have caused the most extreme Greenland ice melting in 50 years. The new research provides further evidence of a key impact of global warming and helps scientists place recent satellite observations of Greenland´s shrinking ice mass in a longer-term climatic context.

Findings in Journal of Climate

20 November 2007
The Power of Multiples:  Connecting Wind Farms Can Make A More Reliable – and Cheaper – Power Source

Wind power, long considered to be as fickle as wind itself, can be groomed to become a steady, dependable source of electricity and delivered at a lower cost than at present, according to scientists at Stanford University.

28 August 2007
SCIENTISTS SEE FIRST SIGNS OF LONG-TERM CHANGES IN TROPICAL RAINFALL

WASHINGTON - NASA scientists have detected the first signs that tropical rainfall is on the rise, using the longest and most complete data record available.

20 August 2007
Scientists Verify Predictive Model for Winter Weather

Scientists have verified the accuracy of a model that uses October snow cover in Siberia to predict upcoming winter temperatures and snowfall for the high- and mid-latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

6 June 2007
AMS Statement on Hurricane Forecasting:  Hurricane Track Forecasts Improved Tremendously in Past 5 Years; Intensity Forecasts, Other Challenges Remain

Hurricane track forecasts, the forecasts that pinpoint the path of a storm, have improved steadily in recent decades with track forecast errors now roughly half of what they were in 1990, but predicting the intensity of the storms is still a challenge for forecasters, according to a new information statement on hurricane forecasting issued by the American Meteorological Society.

14 May 2007
NASA'S CLOSEUP LOOK AT A HURRICANE'S EYE REVEALS A NEW "FUEL" SOURCE

In the eye of a furious hurricane, the weather is often quite calm and sunny. But new NASA research is providing clues about how the seemingly subtle movement of air within and around this region provides energy to keep this central "powerhouse" functioning

14 May 2007
NASA Study Suggests Extreme Summer Warming in the Future

A new study by NASA scientists suggests that greenhouse gas warming may raise average summer temperatures in the eastern United States nearly 10 degrees Fahrenheit by the 2080s.

23 April 2007
CU-BOULDER STUDY TRACES DELAY IN NORTH AMERICAN MONSOON TO PACIFIC OCEAN WARMING

The southwestern United States has experienced a significant delay in its annual summer monsoon rains in recent decades due to warmer sea-surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, according to a new study at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

2 April 2007
REPORT FINDS BETTER COORDINATION IS NEEDED TO DEAL WITH SPACE WEATHER IMPACTS ON AVIATION SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY

Better forecasts of space weather events and better use of those forecasts by the aviation industry could lead to safer operations and hundreds of thousands of dollars in savings for airlines, according to a new report by the American Meteorological Society and SolarMetrics.  The report, “Integrating Space Weather Observations & Forecasts into Aviation Operations,” is the outcome of a two-day workshop last fall among aviation and space weather experts.

1 March 2007
Taking Climate Change Discussions Beyond the Science - AMS Launches New Climate Policy Blog

URL:  http://www.climatepolicy.org/

The American Meteorological Society, the nation's leading professional soci­ety for those in the atmospheric and related sciences, launched a new weblog (“blog”) today to address the challenging policy issues related to climate change.  The goal is to help decision makers at all levels make sound policy based on the best available information.