AMS Publications

High-impact, peer-reviewed scientific journals, award-winning books, a long-standing series of
meteorological monographs, and the highly regarded Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS)

 

Publish for Less

AMS Publications is pleased to announce a reduction in page charges for the Society’s technical journals. Starting with papers submitted on 1 September 2019, authors will see a savings of $25 per typeset page — more than $400 for an average-length article. Now it is more affordable than ever to publish the science that matters in America's premier weather, water, and climate journals.

Learn more

New Journal Articles

{{getPrettyDate(article.dc_date)}}
{{article.title}}
{{article.dc_source}}{{isFinalPub(article) ? '' : ', Early Online Release'}}

 

Publish with AMS

Submit a journal or BAMS article
or organize a special collection
or monograph.

Submit to AMS

Why Publish with AMS?

Get Involved

Volunteer to be a journal reviewer or
submit your name to be considered
for a journal editor role.

Volunteer for Journals

News and Updates

Recent Changes in Mean and Extreme Temperature and Precipitation in the Western Pacific Islands
Recent Changes in Mean and Extreme Temperature and Precipitation in the Western Pacific Islands

A new study in the Journal of Climate explores trends in mean and extreme temperature and precipitation over the period from 1951 to 2015 for stations in the western Pacific.

Precipitation Enhancement via the Interplay between Atmospheric Rivers and Cutoff Lows
Precipitation Enhancement via the Interplay between Atmospheric Rivers and Cutoff Lows

A new study in Monthly Weather Review examines the interplay between atmospheric rivers and cutoff lows and how together these features can create significantly enhanced precipitation, such as what contributed to the disastrous flooding event in Hiroshima, Japan, in 2014.

Numerical Modeling Study of Hijikawa-Arashi
Numerical Modeling Study of Hijikawa-Arashi

A thermally driven nocturnal gap wind, the Hijikawa-Arashi, is studied with a fine-resolution model in a new paper in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology.

Frontal Systems Passing over a Coastal Mountain Range
Frontal Systems Passing over a Coastal Mountain Range

A new study in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences uses airborne precipitation radar data, surface precipitation measurements, and particle size distributions from the OLYMPEX field campaign to examine the vertical structure and microphysical characteristics of frontal systems passing over a three-dimensional coastal mountain range.