Workshop on Data Analysis and Presentation of Cloud Microphysical Measurements

 

Workshop on Data Analysis and Presentation of Cloud Microphysical Measurements
July 5-6, 2014

Boston, MA

Hosted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Meeting Organizers

Andrew Heymsfield   heyms1@ucar.edu

Darrel Baumgardner    darrel.baumgardner@gmail.com

Greg Michael McFarquhar     mcfarq@illinois.edu

Daniel James Cziczo   djcziczo@mit.edu


A meeting is being convened to evaluate methodologies for analyzing and reporting measurements of cloud properties made with in situ sensors. The primary objective is to compare the various algorithms that are in use to process measurements and arrive at some agreement and strategy on optimum techniques for analyzing data, removing artifacts, applying calibrations and corrections and documenting results. This meeting is the second workshop sanctioned by the ICCP and follows the recommendations from the 1st ICCP workshop that was convened in Zurich in July, 2013. The conclusion from that meeting was that there is a large and sometimes confusing diversity in processing algorithms, calibration techniques, terminology and data reporting methodologies that requires closure with respect to a general consensus by the cloud physics research community on optimum techniques and adequate documentation that inform those who do the processing and those who use the results.

The meeting will offer all interested participants the opportunity to learn more about how cloud data gets processed, what the limitations and uncertainties are that are associated with these data and to be a part of the process of standardization and homogenization of data processing, analysis and reporting and the terminology that is associated with these methodologies.

Many of the workshop activities will take place prior to the actual meeting itself. Participants who are interested will download data sets that have been both observed in past field campaigns and simulated to represent measurements from the different types of instruments (e.g. images from OAPs, size distributions and particle-by-particle data from single particle light scattering probes, voltages from hot-wire probes, etc.). All those participating in the exercise will process the data with their own software, and then return their data sets to the meeting coordinators so that their results will be compared with those of others who also processed the data. The tests and comparisons will be done anonymously and will be used as the center for discussions at the workshop for converging on optimum algorithms for processing and reporting measurements from cloud microphysical sensors.

Some travel support may be available, especially for students and new PhDs. The meeting will be held July 5 and 6, 2014, coinciding with the cloud physics conference sponsored by the American Meteorological Society in Boston, July 7-11th. In order for the organizing committee to reserve meeting space and negotiate lodging prices, it is essential that those interested in participating contact us as soon as possible. If interested, please contact one of the members of the organizing committee with the following information:

1) Likelihood of attending

2) If you are an academic, the names and emails of any students that might attend.

3) If you would require financial assistance.

Looking forward to hearing from you soon.

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