AMS Publications

The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, high-impact, peer-reviewed scientific journals, a long-standing series of meteorological monographs, the Glossary of Meteorology, and award-winning books.

The Impact of Land Surface Properties on Haboobs and Dust Lofting

Haboobs are dust storms formed by strong surface winds in convective storm outflow boundaries (cold pools) and can loft large quantities of mineral dust as they move. A new study in JAS uses an ensemble of 120 idealized simulations of daytime and nighttime haboobs to investigate the land surface properties that affect both dust mobilization and cold pool dynamics.

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Significance Statements
Significance Statements

Significance statements are optional statements written in plain language that focus on why the work matters and provide additional context for why the work is relevant to science and society. Authors submitting to AMS Journals (except BAMS) now can include a Significance Statement as part of their paper. Visit our significance statements page for more information.

Fair-Weather Atmospheric Charge Measurements with a Small UAS
Fair-Weather Atmospheric Charge Measurements with a Small UAS

A recent JTECH study presents the first analysis of a new dataset of space charge and meteorology measurements made from the small, electric, fixed-wing UAS model MASC-3.

Accelerated Sea Ice Loss from Late Summer Cyclones in the New Arctic
Accelerated Sea Ice Loss from Late Summer Cyclones in the New Arctic

Synoptic-scale cyclones in the Arctic are an important source of short-term sea ice variability during the melt season. A new study in JCLI examines whether recent changes to the Arctic environment have made Arctic cyclones during the summer months more destructive to sea ice on short time scales.

Formation Mechanisms of the Mesoscale Environment Conducive to a Downslope Windstorm over the Cuyamaca Mountains Associated with Santa Ana Wind during the Cedar Fire (2003)
Formation Mechanisms of the Mesoscale Environment Conducive to a Downslope Windstorm over the Cuyamaca Mountains Associated with Santa Ana Wind during the Cedar Fire (2003)

A new JAMC article uses numerical simulations to investigate the upstream environment’s impacts on the airflow over the lee slope of the Cuyamaca Mountainsnear San Diego, California, during the Cedar Fire in 2003, which was one of the largest wildfire events in California history.

Recent Journal Articles

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